Firework Laws and Safety

File:Exploding Flower Bed fireworks.jpg

Hotdogs are on the grill; thermometer above 90; your children are soaking wet from the sprinklers. Summer is upon us, and there is no better reminder of that than fireworks. Crackles, booms, and snaps, followed by small clouds of smoke create a lifetime of memories. If you’re like me, July is one of the best months of the year. If you’re really like me, you wonder about what the firework laws are this year. Good news: they haven’t changed since last year. If you follow the routine from last year, you should be okay.

What You Can Do:

  • Light fireworks 3 days before and after Independence Day (and Pioneer Day)
  • Purchase arial fireworks. These can shoot up to 150 feet in the air.
  • Light fireworks from 11 am to 11 pm (extended to midnight on July 4th and Pioneer Day)

What You Can’t Do:

  • Bottle rockets, firecrackers, roman candles, and similar fireworks are not permitted.

Check With Your City

Remember that these laws are subject to change based on drought conditions or where you live. Cities can ban fireworks if they are located by potential fire hazards. Call your local fire marshall for information about firework bans in your city or neighborhood.

Although fireworks are fun, they can have unfortunate consequences if used incorrectly. Wildfires, burns, and other injuries are reported every year around Independence Day. You can prevent your 4th of July party from rocketing out of control, by following these tips:

  • Keep a hose or a bucket of water nearby.
  • Stay clear of bushes and dry grass that could catch on fire from a stray flame or spark.
  • Light one firework at a time.
  • Do not stand over the firework when lighting the fuse. Be prepared to run away after it is lit.
  •  Pay close attention to children who are playing with and around sparklers. Sparklers can reach temperatures up to 1900 degrees.
  • Keep your eyes protected. Embers can easily shoot into your eyes. Wear glasses or sunglasses when lighting fireworks.
  • Don’t point or throw a firework and another person.

Celebrate summer safely. A careless action could change your party into a disaster. If you have been injured in a firework accident, call us. We can work with your insurance company, and get you compensation you deserve.

 

Photo copyright to

Eric Kilby
Ken Christensen
Partner, Founder at Christensen & Hymas
Ken Christensen is the founding partner of Christensen & Hymas. He is an avid cyclist, loves baseball, and enjoys spending time with his family in the outdoors.

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